August 2021 Newsletter

Download your copy of the August Newsletter: HCAC August 2021 News

 

Mark your Calendar

August 7th, 7pm -Terra Voce Ensemble

The Highland Center

The Highland County Arts Council will host a concert on August 7 at the Highland Center.The performance features Virginia Commission for the Arts musicians, the Terra Voce Trio.

The Trio is noted for its virtuosity, conversational style of presentation, and genre-‐expanding programs that explore an uncommon mix of classical and traditional folk music styles. It is said, “Their concerts defy expectations.”

Terra Voce has appeared on the Millennium Stage at the Kennedy Center, in the Christ Chapel Chamber Series at New York City’s Riverside Church, and as finalists in the National Flute Association’s Chamber Music Competition.

The evening is a memorial concert arranged by the family of Dorcas Lohr. It is open to all.

Donations may be made to the Arts Council which is hosting the event.

 

Story Telling

August 21st, 7:00p

Church at the Old Oak

on Meadowdale Rd.

Stories, stories, stories… they come in all forms and lengths. Three different styles will be performed at 7:00 pm August 21st performance at Church at the Old Oak in Meadowdale. At the performance, there will be traditional stories by spoken word, sung stories and stories told as miniature plays.

Bucky and Norma Reynolds and Jim Sherman will tell mostly true and not-so-true tales about neighbors, families and hauntings. Rick Hill will sing and play two sets of musical stories. Songs have been very important through history. They can report complicated plots that are somehow easy to remember as long as they’re accompanied by a melody.

Two short plays deal with frustration. In The Man and His Newspaper, a long-married woman struggles to have a serious discussion with her husband, who is engrossed in the news of the larger world. The Tooth Hurts, pits hapless Leon, struggling to be the next tooth fairy, with Mavis, who desperately wants to retire. The Tooth Hurts will star Mary Anne Rogers and Jack Herold.

 

A Statement from outgoing member Jason Canze

When I joined the Arts Council in 2009, it felt like a natural progression for me. I had recently been hired as the music teacher/band director in the local school system and was looking for a way to connect with local musicians and to become more involved within the community. The Arts Council was the perfect fit!

Not only were my goals quickly realized, I soon had the opportunity to learn about and experience a wide array of fine arts that I had previously not been very familiar with. It was thrilling to have access to so many great programs and to be surrounded by such skilled local artists. I was truly astonished that a small organization in a remote, rural area could make such a big impact on my life!

Though many years have passed since I first joined, my enthusiasm for the arts and the Arts Council has only grown stronger. I am exceptionally proud of the progress the organization has made to expand its programs, offer more workshops, and provide better amenities for the community. Of course, none of this progress would be possible without the members and friends who work behind the scenes to make it all happen. Thank you all for making the Arts Council such a terrific organization!

 

Creativity Corner: Bed Padgett

I got into guitar building and repair (lutherie) because I felt a need to make a living doing what I love. Music, art and crafting things have always been me. The idea of securing a job to pay the bills and finding fulfillment elsewhere works for plenty of people and I’m glad that it does but it never felt like me. I have always loved music, art and respected a well-crafted piece. So, it was a natural place for me to end up.

Wood, like any natural material, seems abundant to us here in the Appalachian Mountains but is a finite resource. Because of this, I want to be respectful in my use of it and try to do justice to its natural beauty and sonic properties. My wood stash is from all over the world but I have made a future goal to use locally sourced materials for a number of reasons.

When you go online and look at images of wood and click “buy” it is easy to take it for granted. If I process the wood myself and know where it comes from, it helps me feel connected to the material.

Art is outwardly conveying the inner self and I think about this constantly. My aesthetic visually is modest. I try to honor the rich traditions of guitar making without over embellishing or attempting to reinvent the wheel. Audibly, I want my guitars to sound bigger. I want people to be surprised by the volume, depth and tone.

However, guitars are tools. They are tools used by artists to help draw out emotions. I don’t want my instruments to overpower what someone else is trying to say with them. It’s surely a balancing act and I’m happy to continue to explore and refine my process, craft and tonal voice for the rest of my life right here in Highland County.

You can find examples of my work on my websites and Instagram.

www.padgettguitars.com (custom builds)

www.alleghenylutherie.com (repair work)

Instagram:

@padgettguitars

@allegheny_lutherie

 

An Evening of Southern Gospel Music with Lori Botkin

September 11th at 7pm: The Jones House Garden

Bring a chair and enjoy the music in the open air at one of Monterey’s historic homes

Pay What You Will Donationto support the work of The Highland County Arts Council

 

The Highland Arts Academy: July was a busy month!

Two successful Highland Arts Academy workshops were held in July. Pottery had a full house with eight participants July 19 – 21. Under the direction of Heather Scott and Lorraine White, they created hand built and wheel thrown pieces. According to Lorraine, “the participants were so enthusiastic, they arrived early and stayed late”.

The workshop concluded on July 29 & 30 when the creations will be glazed. The Arts Council is grateful to the Highland School system for the use of the art classroom and their four pottery wheels and kiln.

Local artist Karen Milnes conducted a new addition to the Arts Academy for the 2021 season. On July 22-24, participants learned the art of printmaking. A talented group produced beautiful, original prints and utilized the Arts Council’s printing press in the Council’s classroom. It was wonderful seeing the press, a generous donation by Elizabeth McClung, used by a new group of printing enthusiasts.

August brings more workshop opportunities to learn new skills. Barn Quilt Painting will be taught by Margie Boesch. This workshop filled quickly but two of those registered had to drop out so there are now openings in the August 5 – 8th session. Register quickly if you are interested.

Judith Saunders is back for the 3rd year to teach the popular Basketry workshop on August 12 – 14th at the Highland Center. While this session is full, the Photography workshop on August 19 – 21 still has openings. It promises to be a great experience with talented Elizabeth Larson instructing and several local photographers already signed up to improve their skills as they explore Highland’s countryside.

A new addition that is showing a lot of interest is a fiber workshop for youth ages 10 – 16. We Felt Great will be held at the Monterey Presbyterian Church pavilion on August 14th and taught by felting artist Tate Dunn.

If you are interested in finding out more, visit www.highlandartsacademy.com. A fall Ecoprinting workshop has just been added to the calendar for October 1, 2, & 3 so the 2021 season is not over yet!

 

Musikgarten at The Highland Children’s House

The children in the infant/toddler and pre-school rooms at the Highland Children’s House have been moving, grooving and shaking things up the past few weeks thanks to the generous support of the Highland County Arts Council.

Molly Rose Murphy, singer in the Judy Chops and founder of Queen City Music Studios in Staunton, VA (www.queencitymusicstudios.com) has been leading the kids in their first music class using the Musikgarten curriculum (https://musikgarten.org/).

“Making music, in a joyful and purposeful way, provides a self-recognition in children that help them to enjoy the act of learning,” Dr. Lorna Heyge, Founder of MusikGarden.

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